Retelling Jane Austen

 

I read Pride and Prejudice when I was eight years old. Along with Les Misérables, Mill on the Floss and Lorna Doone. My father had just died and a generous friend of my sister’s had loaned me a collection of her books and comics to help me deal with the pain of losing a parent. It was an abridged version of Austen’s classic, dog-eared with big lettering and black and white sketches.

I loved it.

I was always slightly precocious for my age, the youngest of three siblings, and the story of a mother trying to get her three daughters hitched to wealthy husbands appealed to me. I was hooked. I devoured all the books in the pile. As I grew older, I read the unabridged versions one by one. The pleasure I got from reading them was undiminished.

Austen’s novels take a humorous look at society and life in the late 1700s. There is irony and realism in her plots, characters and the worlds that they inhabit. So much so that if you transport any character to the current world that we live in, they would fit in quite well and you would relate to their predicament. Women, marriage, dysfunctional families, money problems, greed, pride and the biases that all of us hide. These are things we come across daily, don’t we?

The reason Austen’s appeal has stretched across centuries.

Imagine my delight when my publisher Juggernaut Books commissioned me to retell one of Austen’s classic novels last year. Persuasion is the last novel fully completed by Jane Austen and was published at the end of 1817, six months after her death. The novel follows the life of Anne Eliot and her ex-fiancé Commander Frederick Wentworth.

It took me three months to write the novel. While there have been many retellings of this particular tale, I didn’t read a single one of them. I wanted to stay true to Austen and write the story in my own way keeping the modern milieu as a backdrop. My novel takes readers to North Bengal (Siliguri & Jalpaiguri), Kolkata, Gurgaon, Dharamsala and Mcleodganj – towns and cities which are special to me. There’s music, tea, doomed relationships, quirky parents and second chances. Not just that, the protagonist is named after legendary singer Freddy Mercury. In my novel, Commander Frederick Wentworth is reborn as Farrokh “Freddy” Wadhera.

Mr Eashwar’s Daughter is available on Juggernaut Books. You can buy the book here.

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4 thoughts on “Retelling Jane Austen

  1. Sounds very interesting! I haven’t read any Austen book but I will read your book. I wish you all the best. Also, waiting for the book cover and the title. 🙂

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  2. I am eagerly looking forward to this novel 😍 I love Jane Austen and when her novel “Persuasion” is being retold my You I am all excited!!

    Liked by 1 person

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